Archive for 2019

Can Abby live comfortably while saving for retirement if she has no work pension and her spousal support payments end when she’s 65?

September 6th, 2019

The Globe and Mail – By Dianne Maley

At the age of 50 and recently divorced, Abby is making independent financial decisions for the first time in her life. She knows what she has to do.

“I’m trying to learn about finances and investing, and I need to come up with a stepped plan that will help me live a balanced life now while saving and investing for retirement,” Abby writes in an e-mail. She has no work pension. Her spousal support payments will end when she is 65.

She has two children in their 20s, the younger of whom is living at home and going to university. When her son graduates in a couple of years, the family house will be sold and the proceeds divided between Abby and her former husband.

In addition to the family home, Abby and her ex-husband jointly own a company. Under the settlement, he will buy out her share over 15 years. Abby herself has a small business teaching pottery classes, which brings in about $10,000 a year.

“I would like to retire with modest income and be able to travel and enjoy the simple life and live within my means,” Abby writes. Soon, though, she will need to find a place to live.

We asked Ian Black, a fee-only financial planner at Macdonald, Shymko & Co. Ltd. in Vancouver, to look at Abby’s situation.

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This renter shows a five-star retirement is possible even without a real estate windfall

August 2nd, 2019

Financial Post – By Andrew Allentuck

A B.C. man we’ll call Jonah is employed by a high-tech company. He is 52, anticipating retirement at 60. He earns $106,000 per year and has take-home income of $4,800 per month after extensive deductions for benefits and taxes. A renter, he has neither equity in a home nor mortgage debt. His balance sheet is pristine except for $2,000 in credit card debt.

Jonah expects to die by age 85, and has been thinking about his finances in those terms. The problem — what if he lives beyond that?

Jonah’s daily spending is quite modest. He has rented all his adult life and has no plans to change. He prefers public transit to owning a car. He pays his credit card bills monthly, and has avoided other forms of debt. His indulgences are $500 per month for restaurants and travel at $450 per month.

Jonah expects to be alone in his old age.

“I may need assisted living or full-time care,” he notes. For now, he is healthy but his employer’s medical plan will not cover care after retirement. His questions follow from that concern: when he can retire, whether to buy a long-term care policy and should he buy an annuity as a hedge against declines in his $564,000 portfolio of registered and non-registered financial assets?

Family Finance asked Ian Black, a planner with Macdonald Shymko and Company in Vancouver, to work with Jonah.

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Can This Single-Income Couple with Two Teenagers Soon Retire?

March 15th, 2019

Special to The Globe and Mail – By Dianne Maley

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Living well below their means has paid off for Ellie and Evan, a single-income couple with two teenagers and a strong desire for Evan to retire from work early. He is 50, she is 49.

Helping their plans are their suburban Vancouver house, which has risen substantially in value, Evan’s two defined benefit pension plans, one from a previous employer, and $11,000 in rental income from a lower-level apartment. Evan earns about $106,500 a year.

“We have saved hard for many years,” Ellie writes in an e-mail. “My husband is the only breadwinner in our family.” Their younger child is in high school and the older one is in university, she adds. They have substantial savings and investments and a mortgage-free house worth about $1,150,000. Their only debt is a $130,000 investment loan, which will be paid off by the time Evan retires.

Evan plans to retire in four and a half years, at the age of 55. The couple’s retirement spending goal is $75,000 a year after tax, far more than the $46,700 a year they are spending now, excluding savings and the loan repayment. After Evan retires, they plan to use the extra money to travel, go kayaking and take plenty of short trips.

We asked Keith Copping, a fee-only financial planner and portfolio manager at Macdonald, Shymko & Co. Ltd. in Vancouver, to look at Ellie and Evan’s situation.

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